Getting Ticked Without Sinning

A little over a week ago my wife and I were returning from our 15th anniversary getaway. While enduring a rather lengthy layover in Chicago’s O’Hare, we were startled to see a man get kicked off his flight. After a United agent had checked his boarding pass, this young man had thrown a rather rude comment over his shoulder while entering the jet bridge. Apparently he had had enough that day with flight delays, re-routes, gate changes, etc. That brief retort did him in, however; a manager rushed onto the plane and forced him off. Cursing and yelling, this angry traveler demanded his rights and berated the gate agents while his flight continued to board without him. He finally stomped off down the concourse in a fit of rage.

I’m sure most people present thought he was a complete loser. But I couldn’t help putting myself in his shoes and feeling his pain. He had been pushed to the edge, and had snapped. Has that ever happened to you?

I vividly remember when I once lost it. It also happened right before I boarded a flight. I was still single, traveling in China with a group of guys. Struggling with culture shock and fear of getting apprehended by the authorities, I came unglued when a security agent asked me to open my bag. I pretended I hadn’t heard, put my head down, and forged ahead toward my gate. Of course I didn’t get far. They held the plane for me that day though. And after investigating my bags they let me board without further trouble.

I remember my embarrassment; my overwhelming sense of guilt for having left such a terrible testimony. I also did a lot of repenting that evening—before the sun set.

Ephesians 4:26-27 gives us some directives on handling anger. “In your anger do not sin,” Paul says. “Do not let the sun go down while you are still angry, and do not give the devil a foothold.”

First, note that the Greek word for anger here is actually a command. Anger is an emotion that must be felt—not suppressed or denied. We’re ordered to be angry. In fact, anger is a negative emotion one keenly feels when perceiving that an act of injustice has occurred.

So not all anger is bad. It’s evidence, you might say, that we’ve been made in God’s image. Something within us cries out for the world to be made right.

Next, Paul points out; do not sin in your anger. “Go ahead—be mad,” he writes, “but when you’re ticked off, remember that sinning is off limits!”

Our problem is not anger; rather, it’s the sinful ways we tend to respond to it. Expressing anger in immature, selfish, and hurtful ways is always sin. If we don’t properly deal with our anger it can destroy both us and others. Buried anger eventually leads a person into pits of depression. Concealed anger eventually leaks out and poisons relationships, much like toxic waste that seeps into the water table.

Last of all, deal with your anger quickly—before the sun sets! The longer you wait the harder it is to resolve an issue. Going to bed angry makes your anger behave like cement; it hardens during the night. Holding on to anger also builds a wall of resentment between relationships. One person wisely said, “Do not erect a shrine to your anger in your heart. If you do, the devil will appoint himself its priest.”

So how do you deal with your anger? Do you tend to own it and get over it or do you tend to excuse it or suppress it? Be brave, leave a comment. Share your strategies for overcoming anger; your coping mechanisms.

Luke Kuepfer | March 20, 2011
  • Berni March 20, 2011 at 1:37 am
    I wish i could say i have succeeded & triumphed GREATLY in the way I deal with & express my anger, but there's always the times when I mess up! I know I am not what I USED to be, and I ALSO know that since I have started listening to the Holy Spirit & depending on HIM to calm me down with His promptings and give me positive & creative solutions to the MANY annoyances & problems that hit me every day, the 'major melt downs' & temper tantrums have become a thing of the past. (it's about time... I'm turning 40 this year lol) When i feel myself getting REALLY angry I tend to go to a quiet spot, vent to the Great I Am :o), have a good cry depending on the situation, pray & eventually listen to worship music or go to the piano... sometimes it helps me to write a list of what is going wrong and then I ask God to speak to me in each situation... That doesn't mean there aren't times when I blurt out hurtful things, speak cruelly or negatively in a hurtful manner to my kiddos or husband. Immediately after I am filled with remorse. I THEN need to humble myself, admit my guilt & mistakes & ask for forgiveness. Perhaps these times happen so I can better train my children :o)... not in how to handle my anger in the wrong way but how to be truly sorry and how to humble myself to ask for forgiveness.
    • thetruthmadesimple March 20, 2011 at 1:00 pm
      Great stuff Berni...you reminded me of two things--living with awareness (listening for the still small voice) and the need for immediacy in making things right. So many times small issues become big issues simply because of the time factor.
  • Jon March 20, 2011 at 2:02 am
    I find I often excuse it, "if he wouldnt have cut me off," it's often tough to own it and get over it, could use some ideas on how.
    • thetruthmadesimple March 20, 2011 at 1:13 pm
      I really thought of this with that guy at the airport...my normal tendency is to see things from my perspective (Anaïs Nin said, "We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are") and thus miss out on what he must have been going through (btw, it cuts both ways...had this guy thought about the ticket agent, the other people in line, etc. it would also have cut down on his negative response). I find my anger diminishes significantly the instant I attempt to get in the other person's shoes. The guy that cut you off...what if his wife was in labor...what if he was consecutively late to work for the umpteenth time and this was gonna be the last straw with his boss...what if, etc. Wasn't it Donald Miller who talked about reminding himself constantly that, "he is more important than me" when people cut him off in traffic? I have this faint memory stirring of one of his crazy stories...he once said that we believe that everything is a movie about us...we have two video inputs (eyes), two audio inputs (ears)...everyone else is a minor character in this movie about us...that's our default tendency...it's how we are hardwired. I need to remind myself constantly of John C. Maxwell's statement: "The entire world, with one small exception, is composed of others."
  • Galen March 20, 2011 at 12:39 pm
    Good words Luke. I don't feel like I have much wisdom on this issue, but I have found that when those around me express to me how my sinning anger makes them feel it motivates me to overcome. So often, especially in verbal anger, we think the anger adds impact to our words. Turns out, it has the opposite effect.... Keep blogging brother.
    • thetruthmadesimple March 20, 2011 at 1:22 pm
      Very true...those who share how they feel vs. those who attack you personally ("You ARE an angry person") help you overcome it...the others further exacerbate the issue since we tend to live up to people's negative prophecies. And yes, the more we turn up the volume the less people hear!
  • Andy Martin March 20, 2011 at 1:08 pm
    Hi Luke - saw this on FB and read your article. I like what you have to say - it is well written and has good biblical and pyschological truth. I had some difficulty with the last paragraph. My concern is that dealing quickly with the deep emotion of anger is liable to gloss it over. I am not convinced that we are able to fully realize our own anger, it can lurk in the deepest hallways of our psyche. Some of the nicest people who try their best to always be nice, may in fact be deeply angry. Anger does not always look angry and Christian people may be the very best at hiding this deep emotion because many have been taught that it is simply wrong and fail to understand their emotional self because they prioritize spiritual over emotional not realizing they are connected. Your article is clear that anger of itself is not bad, but I think you fail to understand the depth and complexity of anger and emotions if you think we can deal with it by sundown. I know for one that I have much anger, but hopefully it is in the process of becoming more redemptive rather than toxic. Thanks again for the thoughts.
    • thetruthmadesimple March 20, 2011 at 1:50 pm
      I think you're touching on something Andy that definitely deserves greater treatment. Perhaps we could say that there are different levels of anger or use other terms to describe what those levels look like. Basic anger, for lack of a better term, if not dealt with "by sunset" gives the devil a foothold. This "root of bitterness" over time constructs a fortified anger; given the time investment in building it, one must not lightly think they've completely absolved it by dealing with it quickly by sunset. However, couldn't we argue that once one is aware of their depth of anger/bitterness that they should make the choice "by sunset" to begin dealing with it? Just this morning, I watched the "Maxwell Minute" on motivation...John pointed out that often motivation kicks in once we've started the activity we weren't motivated to do in the first place; it doesn't come before the action but with the action. Making the choice to unravel and repent of our anger empowers us to begin dealing with our anger. Our family saw this graphically played out for us this week while watching the movie, "Amish Grace."
      • Andy Martin March 20, 2011 at 6:56 pm
        So, on one hand you say "anger . . . must be felt - not suppressed", on the other hand you recommend dealing with it by sunset as if it needs to be purged quickly; this seems somewhat contradictory. For many deeply wounded people it takes years of risky self-reflection to even become aware of their anger, such in the case of being sexually abused where the victims universally blame themselves. I have to admit I am reactive to the idea of "truth as simple" which was part of my upbringing and seems to be attractive in certain Christian streams. I would appeal to the early church Fathers and to 1500 yrs of Christian spiritual writers from the monastic tradition all of which shaped early Anabaptists and are a good source from which to argue that the "Truth" is far from simple. If God is the source of all truth we surely demean God by suggesting truth is simple. Truth in the pre-modern view was always about God - back when theology was the queen of the sciences. The Amish, of which you refer, are closer to that ancient stream of thinking and I find their theology far more profound simply because they don't profess to understand a lot of things - their God is one of mystery and they simply "hope" trust in this God. On the one hand God reaches into time and space in ways that are comprehendible by the most "simple" on the other hand the fullness of God is far beyond our comprehension so that we can never even fully know ourselves who are created in his image. So my concern with the way you are talking about anger is that by "dealing" with it might leave us with the impression that "we" somehow are more capable than we actually are. To truly root out our anger, we need insight that comes from God, but that requires a life of growth and "becoming" and this is not even accomplished in most people in a lifetime.
        • thetruthmadesimple March 20, 2011 at 8:56 pm
          According to the passage I was working with I think that certain types of anger need to be dealt with quickly lest they lead to bitterness. I would agree for those who have been deeply wounded that an awareness of that anger and subsequent healing may take much longer--that wasn't the focus of my post however. As far as the "truth as simple" I've never made that claim but rather just the opposite. I agree strongly with Peter Kreeft, who, (interestingly enough, an evangelical turned Catholic) in his book, Three Philosophies of Life, claims that the book of Job is a mystery answering another mystery. The mystery it answers is, in his words, "life's deepest problem, the problem of evil, of suffering, of injustice in a world supposedly ruled by a just God. This God, however, is not a hard, bright, brittle, little formula but a mystery. He is the God of whom rabbi Abraham Heschel said, 'God is not nice. God is not uncle. God is an earthquake.'" Job never gets answers to his deepest questions on suffering and evil. Rather, he gets realigned with WHO God is and reminded to hope and trust in this God regardless of what makes sense in the world--something you explained so well in the above comment. Please also note that my blog is the "truth MADE simple" vs. the "truth IS simple". As a communicator I attempt to take complexity and explain it or interpret it. While much of it remains a mystery--even the Apostle Paul said that he sees through a glass darkly--there are certain aspects that God wants us to discover and unveil.
  • Andy Martin March 21, 2011 at 12:24 am
    Thanks for the interchange Luke. I like your latest comments. My judgement in a nutshell is that it feels to me like you want to define a problem and resolve in 250 words. Maybe 250 words is the average attention span of our population?
    • thetruthmadesimple March 21, 2011 at 12:32 am
      I've enjoyed it too Andy...and unfortunately your point about 250 words being the attention span of our population may be all too true! :-) I read somewhere recently by an uber-blogger that 500 words is about all you should write in a post! Thanks for weighing in!
  • DB March 21, 2011 at 2:46 am
    Enjoyed the article, Luke. A diagram given to me several months ago has been very helpful in my own life. Column one lists things done to me which damage me. Column two lists the natural emotions we will experience as a result, anger being one of them. Next on the diagram is a line, called the "sin wall". After the line, is a list of sins, such as bitterness, pride, hypocrisy, etc. The explanation given was that wrong will be done to us, we will naturally experience emotions in response, then we can either choose to take those emotions to Jesus, or we will cross the "sin wall", and give in to sinful responses. Rather a simplistic explanation maybe, but has been so practical for me.
    • thetruthmadesimple March 21, 2011 at 10:39 am
      Very practical...thanks for the insight. And the key point here for me is found in your word "choose." I remember Stephen Covey talking about one of the most powerful insights he ever had...that "between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space lies our freedom and power to choose our response. In those choices lie our growth and our happiness." The art is in building awareness of that space, expanding that space, and ultimately cashing in wisely while in that space.
  • Kaye March 22, 2011 at 6:20 pm
    "Going to bed angry makes your anger behave like cement; it hardens during the night." That may be the best reasoning I've heard for the command about not letting the sun go down on our wrath. Thank you for articulating it so well, Luke. As to the speed with which we deal with our anger & whether it is possible or healthy to do so before sun-down, might I suggest that this "choosing"to own our anger, this taking a first step to deal with it, might be a key. Not sure that I'm explaining it well, but we all know that there are several ways to immediately respond to our own anger - whether through expressing it or denying it. What I have often experienced is that "choice point" that Covey & others talk about - that taking myself in hand & making a decision about this anger &/or what caused it. And yes, certainly it may take more than one evening to deal with it, but I can "decide" to begin the journey of handling it the right way. I can choose to start the steps - whether that means journaling, prayer & more prayer, deliberately postponing my response until I cool down, calling an accountability partner, etc. Yes, I believe that that "choice point" is very important - where I can consciously choose to start moving in the right direction & where I ask God for help ... OR ... I can choose to let my anger harden by excusing, justifying, or denying it.
    • thetruthmadesimple March 24, 2011 at 12:30 am
      Amen, Kaye...I agree...the choice point is where it begins! And if a positive choice is made it gives us momentum to go through with it.

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Contact MeContact Me

Let's Connect

I’d love to connect with you via email or phone. Snail mail can be sent to the address listed below.

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333 East Margaret Drive, Wilmore, KY 40390

Phone

(+1) 269.625.3400

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Logistics and Details

Select me as your speaker, and I will give you my best effort. See me as a catalyst or facilitator that will help you achieve the goals you’ve set for your event. When you win, I win. It’s as simple as that. I’m here to serve you in life’s journey!

Venue

A venue for the event should be chosen with the target audience in mind. All-day or half-day workshops are ideally hosted in rooms where food can be served and participants can gather around tables for group dialogue and breakout sessions (click on links for preferred room setup: round/long tables). All venues should be suited for multi-media presentations and wired for sound.

Once a date and presentation topic have been confirmed for an event, the venue name and address along with a contact phone number should be submitted for advertisement purposes. These will be posted in my speaking schedule and used in advertising media.

rosedale

Equipment

A room featuring a multi-media projector with 3000 lumens or greater is preferred for all events. I will use my own projector when one is not available. Please note that for most presentations and workshops I need my laptop at the front of the venue from where I’ll be speaking. My system can accommodate VGA/HDMI/DVI cables. Most of my presentations are designed for widescreen (16:9).

For audio I prefer a lapel or Countryman microphone. For presentation/video audio I can supply my own speaker for groups under 100 people. For larger groups I need an audio cable (3.5mm mini stereo) that plugs directly into my laptop.

Replace lecterns and pulpits with a small table or stand on which to place a laptop.

For workshops, have a flip chart or white board available with markers in several colors.

An eight-foot table should be available on which to place books, CDs, DVDs, and other resources for sale. Cash, checks, and credit cards are all accepted.

Fees

I do not charge a set fee when speaking at non-profit events. However, donations are welcome to support my family, cover bills, and feed my Puggle. Suggested donation amount is $500/day plus travel expenses. If I’m within 8 hours of an event I will drive (suggested reimbursement of $250), otherwise I typically fly (if within the USA, $500). I fly out of Lexington, KY and typically purchase my own tickets; a reimbursement check can be mailed to 333 East Margaret Drive, Wilmore, KY 40390.

cnx2016

I’d be delighted to come to your event and speak. I typically keep my events within a 1-3 day time period due to commitments to my family; anything over this length of time is generally reserved for international travel. Workshops can be facilitated as whole-day or half-day events. My multi-part series can be easily held over a weekend, beginning Friday night and ending Sunday morning or beginning Sunday morning and ending Monday evening.

About MeAbout Me

Speaker, author, and life coach.

Born in Ontario, Canada, I moved to El Salvador at age 4 to live as a missionary kid for three years. At age nineteen I moved to Alberta, Canada where I taught school for three years. After leading several short term teams to Asia focused on unreached people groups, I married my sweetheart Amy and lived in Northern Indiana for a year and a half. In 1997, we moved with our infant daughter Brittany to Thailand where I served as director of Global Tribes Outreach. During our ten-year stint in Southeast Asia, God blessed us with two more children—Courtney and Jamin. In 2008 we moved back to North America and bought our first house in Kentucky, USA. I acquired a Masters in Christian Leadership from Asbury Seminary in 2014 and now travel both domestically and internationally to develop leaders.

As a leadership developer and life coach I help non-profit and business leaders understand how to maximize their God-given potential to lead and serve others. I am the author of A Serving Leader’s Devotional and the President of the Reverb Network.

I’ve spoken broadly on personal & global mission, leadership, team building, and numerous Biblical subjects over the last 20 years on four continents and numerous states and provinces in the USA and Canada.

I am committed to a Biblical worldview and dedicated to motivating the church toward missional thinking and practice in all areas of life. I believe that everyone has a God-given purpose to love and serve others like Jesus. I firmly believe that having our thinking challenged is not enough; it must be translated into change.

MY STORY

I have heard from other staff members who agree with me, this was one of the best/productive workshops we've attended.

Dan Domer
Staff Member, Covenant Church, Winterville, NC

Your talk rocked my world.  

Qian Wang
Perspectives Student, College Station, TX

Luke Kuepfer’s high-energy presentation of the material was delightful, articulate, and profound! If you are looking for a fresh and life-changing look at Jesus’ servant leadership model, look no further! Give Luke a call!

Don Showalter
President, Hearts Alive!

Luke is a dynamic speaker with the gift of clearly articulating Biblical truths in an easy-to-understand manner. He speaks in humility but with authority, and injects his message with the experience and global perspective gained from living abroad as a missionary for many years.

Santosh David Poonen
Elder, River of Life Christian Fellowship, Loveland, CO

Luke’s enthusiasm and passion for the local church and its impact in the community is inspiring. I highly recommend his teaching and ministry!  

Clarence Miller
Deacon, Sharon Mennonite Church

“Transformational” is the one word I would use to describe the seminar. Luke has a true gift in communicating God’s truths with clarity and passion.

Joe Bacher
Pastor, Foothills Fellowship Westminster, SC

Luke is enthusiastic and knowledgeable, presenting the interactive material creatively. It is a unique presentation unlike the usual “leadership seminars” taught from the front. Luke presents it with expertise, fun, and interest in each attendee.

David Livingstone
Regional Manager, North-East & Mid-Atlantic Region, The JESUS Film Project

Luke really has an incredible way of captivating everyone’s attention and making a seminar meaningful. He speaks from his heart and lives what he preaches. As a result of this Encounter we’re taking our family to Southeast Asia on a two-month mission trip with the possibility of moving there long-term.

Lloyd & Mary Ellen Esh
Pastor, New Covenant Mennonite Fellowship New Holland, PA

REVIEWS

SKILLS

Years Lived Abroad
0
Countries Visited
0
14-ers Climbed in CO
0
Places Lived
0
2014 - 2018

SPEAKER, COACH, & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPER

Presentations and workshops in both non-profit and business venues around the world on leadership, people skills, and life purpose.

2011- 2013

STUDENT @ ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Masters Degree in Christian Leadership.

2009 - 2010

STUDENT @ THOMAS EDISON STATE COLLEGE

Bachelor’s Degree online in Liberal Studies.

1997 - 2008

DIRECTOR @ GLOBAL TRIBES OUTREACH

Founded and served as Field Director of Global Tribes Outreach (GTO), a non-profit organization based in Southeast Asia committed to church planting and social work.

1994 - 1996

WORKER IN CONSTRUCTION AND AGRICULTURE

Floor finishing in concrete construction and equipment operator on a cash crop farm.

1990 - 1993

TEACHER @ PRAIRIE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

Taught elementary through high school students in a self-directed learning environment.

Contact MeContact Me

Let's Connect

I’d love to connect with you via email or phone. Snail mail can be sent to the address listed below.

Address

333 East Margaret Drive, Wilmore, KY 40390

Phone

(+1) 269.625.3400

Booking InfoBooking Info

Logistics and Details

Select me as your speaker, and I will give you my best effort. See me as a catalyst or facilitator that will help you achieve the goals you’ve set for your event. When you win, I win. It’s as simple as that. I’m here to serve you in life’s journey!

Venue

A venue for the event should be chosen with the target audience in mind. All-day or half-day workshops are ideally hosted in rooms where food can be served and participants can gather around tables for group dialogue and breakout sessions (click on links for preferred room setup: round/long tables). All venues should be suited for multi-media presentations and wired for sound.

Once a date and presentation topic have been confirmed for an event, the venue name and address along with a contact phone number should be submitted for advertisement purposes. These will be posted in my speaking schedule and used in advertising media.

rosedale

Equipment

A room featuring a multi-media projector with 3000 lumens or greater is preferred for all events. I will use my own projector when one is not available. Please note that for most presentations and workshops I need my laptop at the front of the venue from where I’ll be speaking. My system can accommodate VGA/HDMI/DVI cables. Most of my presentations are designed for widescreen (16:9).

For audio I prefer a lapel or Countryman microphone. For presentation/video audio I can supply my own speaker for groups under 100 people. For larger groups I need an audio cable (3.5mm mini stereo) that plugs directly into my laptop.

Replace lecterns and pulpits with a small table or stand on which to place a laptop.

For workshops, have a flip chart or white board available with markers in several colors.

An eight-foot table should be available on which to place books, CDs, DVDs, and other resources for sale. Cash, checks, and credit cards are all accepted.

Fees

I do not charge a set fee when speaking at non-profit events. However, donations are welcome to support my family, cover bills, and feed my Puggle. Suggested donation amount is $500/day plus travel expenses. If I’m within 8 hours of an event I will drive (suggested reimbursement of $250), otherwise I typically fly (if within the USA, $500). I fly out of Lexington, KY and typically purchase my own tickets; a reimbursement check can be mailed to 333 East Margaret Drive, Wilmore, KY 40390.

cnx2016

I’d be delighted to come to your event and speak. I typically keep my events within a 1-3 day time period due to commitments to my family; anything over this length of time is generally reserved for international travel. Workshops can be facilitated as whole-day or half-day events. My multi-part series can be easily held over a weekend, beginning Friday night and ending Sunday morning or beginning Sunday morning and ending Monday evening.

About MeAbout Me

Speaker, author, and life coach.

Born in Ontario, Canada, I moved to El Salvador at age 4 to live as a missionary kid for three years. At age nineteen I moved to Alberta, Canada where I taught school for three years. After leading several short term teams to Asia focused on unreached people groups, I married my sweetheart Amy and lived in Northern Indiana for a year and a half. In 1997, we moved with our infant daughter Brittany to Thailand where I served as director of Global Tribes Outreach. During our ten-year stint in Southeast Asia, God blessed us with two more children—Courtney and Jamin. In 2008 we moved back to North America and bought our first house in Kentucky, USA. I acquired a Masters in Christian Leadership from Asbury Seminary in 2014 and now travel both domestically and internationally to develop leaders.

As a leadership developer and life coach I help non-profit and business leaders understand how to maximize their God-given potential to lead and serve others. I am the author of A Serving Leader’s Devotional and the President of the Reverb Network.

I’ve spoken broadly on personal & global mission, leadership, team building, and numerous Biblical subjects over the last 20 years on four continents and numerous states and provinces in the USA and Canada.

I am committed to a Biblical worldview and dedicated to motivating the church toward missional thinking and practice in all areas of life. I believe that everyone has a God-given purpose to love and serve others like Jesus. I firmly believe that having our thinking challenged is not enough; it must be translated into change.

MY STORY

I have heard from other staff members who agree with me, this was one of the best/productive workshops we've attended.

Dan Domer
Staff Member, Covenant Church, Winterville, NC

Your talk rocked my world.  

Qian Wang
Perspectives Student, College Station, TX

Luke Kuepfer’s high-energy presentation of the material was delightful, articulate, and profound! If you are looking for a fresh and life-changing look at Jesus’ servant leadership model, look no further! Give Luke a call!

Don Showalter
President, Hearts Alive!

Luke is a dynamic speaker with the gift of clearly articulating Biblical truths in an easy-to-understand manner. He speaks in humility but with authority, and injects his message with the experience and global perspective gained from living abroad as a missionary for many years.

Santosh David Poonen
Elder, River of Life Christian Fellowship, Loveland, CO

Luke’s enthusiasm and passion for the local church and its impact in the community is inspiring. I highly recommend his teaching and ministry!  

Clarence Miller
Deacon, Sharon Mennonite Church

“Transformational” is the one word I would use to describe the seminar. Luke has a true gift in communicating God’s truths with clarity and passion.

Joe Bacher
Pastor, Foothills Fellowship Westminster, SC

Luke is enthusiastic and knowledgeable, presenting the interactive material creatively. It is a unique presentation unlike the usual “leadership seminars” taught from the front. Luke presents it with expertise, fun, and interest in each attendee.

David Livingstone
Regional Manager, North-East & Mid-Atlantic Region, The JESUS Film Project

Luke really has an incredible way of captivating everyone’s attention and making a seminar meaningful. He speaks from his heart and lives what he preaches. As a result of this Encounter we’re taking our family to Southeast Asia on a two-month mission trip with the possibility of moving there long-term.

Lloyd & Mary Ellen Esh
Pastor, New Covenant Mennonite Fellowship New Holland, PA

REVIEWS

SKILLS

Years Lived Abroad
0
Countries Visited
0
14-ers Climbed in CO
0
Places Lived
0
2014 - 2018

SPEAKER, COACH, & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPER

Presentations and workshops in both non-profit and business venues around the world on leadership, people skills, and life purpose.

2011- 2013

STUDENT @ ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Masters Degree in Christian Leadership.

2009 - 2010

STUDENT @ THOMAS EDISON STATE COLLEGE

Bachelor’s Degree online in Liberal Studies.

1997 - 2008

DIRECTOR @ GLOBAL TRIBES OUTREACH

Founded and served as Field Director of Global Tribes Outreach (GTO), a non-profit organization based in Southeast Asia committed to church planting and social work.

1994 - 1996

WORKER IN CONSTRUCTION AND AGRICULTURE

Floor finishing in concrete construction and equipment operator on a cash crop farm.

1990 - 1993

TEACHER @ PRAIRIE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

Taught elementary through high school students in a self-directed learning environment.